Sunday, March 27, 2011

ORA-27038: created file already exists in expdp

expdp/impdp were new export/import features introduced in Oracle 10g and they were first messenger that days of "old" exp/imp utility, that was with us from the very Oracle beginning, are numbered. And really that happened in Oracle 11g with short notice that exp/imp are no longer sported. Beside many new features that any new Oracle tool brings, there are (at least in first release) some disadvantages. One of it was that expdp was not able to overwrite existing file (what was not a problem for exp).

The problem

Error was manifested in a way:
Export: Release 10.2.0.5.0 - Production on Srijeda, 24 O┼żujak, 2011 15:19:00

Copyright (c) 2003, 2007, Oracle.  All rights reserved.

Connected to: Oracle Database 10g Release 10.2.0.5.0 - Production
ORA-39001: invalid argument value
ORA-39000: bad dump file specification
ORA-31641: unable to create dump file "E:\dmp\DB1_SCHEMAS_5.expdp"
ORA-27038: created file already exists
OSD-04010: <create> option specified, file already exists
About that error there were many articles posted around Internet. If you are dealing with just one file then erase it ant problem is solved. But if you use expdp as logical backup, based on retention in days, then mentioned task might not be so easy. So I'll try to post mine approach with 7 days retention policy situation (which suit mine needs). Mine client was using Oracle on Windows, so this was another challenge to "sharp" batch scripts knowledge (I admit that windows batch scripts are still to me Terra incognita in many aspects).

The solution

First let me say, that if you want to have more consistent "schema" expdp export, then single dump file is not enough. "Schema" based expdp, has more then known limitations:
  • Public synonyms are not exported at all
  • Some other schema objects are not exported as well (in mine case DIRECTORY is the only interesting thing to monitor).
So in mine case I'd rather speak about "backup set" because it is compound of five files:
  1. expdp dump file
  2. expdp log file
  3. create DIRECTORY script
  4. grant DIRECTORY script
  5. create PUBLIC SYNONYMS script

7 days retention policy

"7 days retention policy" means that every backup files set is overwritten every 7th day. Here is typical directory structure where backup files are placed. Listing shows files after full 7 days cycle:
e:\dmp>dir
 Volume in drive E is BCKP
 Volume Serial Number is 50AB-BS33

 Directory of e:\dmp

26.03.2011  20:20    <DIR>          .
26.03.2011  20:20    <DIR>          ..
20.03.2011  06:00         1.241.561 DB1_SCHEMAS_1.EXPDP
20.03.2011  06:00             4.905 db1_schemas_1.log
20.03.2011  06:00               413 DB1_SCHEMAS_1_directories.sql
20.03.2011  06:00               407 DB1_SCHEMAS_1_directories_grant.sql
20.03.2011  06:00             1.491 DB1_SCHEMAS_1_public_synonyms.sql
21.03.2011  06:00         1.241.561 DB1_SCHEMAS_2.EXPDP
21.03.2011  06:00             4.905 db1_schemas_2.log
21.03.2011  06:00               413 DB1_SCHEMAS_2_directories.sql
21.03.2011  06:00               407 DB1_SCHEMAS_2_directories_grant.sql
21.03.2011  06:00             1.491 DB1_SCHEMAS_2_public_synonyms.sql
22.03.2011  06:00         1.241.561 DB1_SCHEMAS_3.EXPDP
22.03.2011  06:00             4.905 db1_schemas_3.log
22.03.2011  06:00               413 DB1_SCHEMAS_3_directories.sql
22.03.2011  06:00               407 DB1_SCHEMAS_3_directories_grant.sql
22.03.2011  06:00             1.491 DB1_SCHEMAS_3_public_synonyms.sql
23.03.2011  06:00         1.241.561 DB1_SCHEMAS_4.EXPDP
23.03.2011  06:00             4.905 db1_schemas_4.log
23.03.2011  06:00               413 DB1_SCHEMAS_4_directories.sql
23.03.2011  06:00               407 DB1_SCHEMAS_4_directories_grant.sql
23.03.2011  06:00             1.491 DB1_SCHEMAS_4_public_synonyms.sql
24.03.2011  06:00         1.241.561 DB1_SCHEMAS_5.EXPDP
24.03.2011  06:00             4.905 db1_schemas_5.log
24.03.2011  06:00               413 DB1_SCHEMAS_5_directories.sql
24.03.2011  06:00               407 DB1_SCHEMAS_5_directories_grant.sql
24.03.2011  06:00             1.491 DB1_SCHEMAS_5_public_synonyms.sql
25.03.2011  06:00         1.245.110 DB1_SCHEMAS_6.EXPDP
25.03.2011  06:00             4.905 db1_schemas_6.log
25.03.2011  06:00               413 DB1_SCHEMAS_6_directories.sql
25.03.2011  06:00               407 DB1_SCHEMAS_6_directories_grant.sql
25.03.2011  06:00             1.491 DB1_SCHEMAS_6_public_synonyms.sql
26.03.2011  06:00         1.245.284 DB1_SCHEMAS_7.EXPDP
26.03.2011  06:00             4.907 db1_schemas_7.log
26.03.2011  06:00               413 DB1_SCHEMAS_7_directories.sql
26.03.2011  06:00               407 DB1_SCHEMAS_7_directories_grant.sql
26.03.2011  06:00             1.491 DB1_SCHEMAS_7_public_synonyms.sql
              35 File(s)      8.748.713 bytes
               2 Dir(s)  82.779.652.096 bytes free

e:\dmp>
All files has similar names with only distinct-numbered day of week when backup was taken. Number for that means (in mine case Win CP 1250):
  • 1 = Sunday
  • 2 = Monday
  • 3 = Tuesday
  • 4 = Wednesday
  • 5 = Thursday
  • 6 = Friday
  • 7 = Saturday

dayofweek.vbs

Because I didn't find any other way to get day of week in Windows scripts, I use small VB script which I called "dayofweek.vbs". This script which has just one line is here:
WScript.Echo DatePart("w", Date)

Backup script

Now when I get all the parts, I can show the whole backup script, which handle expdp automatically:
@ECHO ON
@ECHO Expdp tab_dwh, tab_apex i tab_int schema (7 times a week including public synonyms and directories!)
@ECHO OFF
@for /f %%d in ('cscript dayofweek.vbs //nologo') do (
  @ECHO "Working export dump for day %%d"
  @ECHO OFF
  @ECHO set timi off head off^&echo. select DIRECTORY_PATH from dba_directories where DIRECTORY_NAME='DATA_PUMP_DIR'; | sqlplus -s "/ as sysdba" | findstr . > result.tmp
  FOR /F %%i IN (result.tmp) DO (
  echo Y | del %%i\db1_schemas_%%d.expdp 
  echo Y | del %%i\db1_schemas_%%d.log
  )
  @del result.tmp
  
  @ECHO ON  
  expdp '/ as sysdba' DUMPFILE=db1_schemas_%%d.expdp LOGFILE=db1_schemas_%%d.log  DIRECTORY=DATA_PUMP_DIR SCHEMAS=TAB_DWH,TAB_APEX,TAB_INT,TOOLS VERSION=10.2.0
  
  @REM PUBLIC SYNONYMS
  @ECHO OFF
  (
  echo set cmdsep on
  echo set cmdsep '"'; --"
  echo "set linesize 160"
  echo "set head off"
  echo "set feedback off"
  echo "select 'create or replace public synonym ' || synonym_name || ' for ' || table_owner || '.' || table_name || ';' from dba_synonyms where owner='PUBLIC' and table_owner IN ('TOOLS','TAB_APEX','TAB_INT','TAB_DWH') order by table_owner, synonym_name;"
  ) | sqlplus -s "/ as sysdba" | findstr . > e:\dmp\D1_SCHEMAS_%%d_public_synonyms.sql

  @REM DIRECTORIES
  @ECHO OFF
  (
  echo set cmdsep on
  echo set cmdsep '"'; --"
  echo "set linesize 160"
  echo "set head off"
  echo "set feedback off"
  echo "select 'create directory ' ||  DIRECTORY_NAME || ' AS ' ||'''' || DIRECTORY_PATH || ''' ;' from dba_directories d, sys.dba_tab_privs p where p.grantee in ('TOOLS','TAB_APEX','TAB_INT','TAB_DWH')   and D.DIRECTORY_NAME = p.TABLE_NAME and P.OWNER = 'SYS';"
  ) | sqlplus -s "/ as sysdba" | findstr . > e:\dmp\DB1_SCHEMAS_%%d_directories.sql

  @ECHO OFF
  (
  echo set cmdsep on
  echo set cmdsep '"'; --"
  echo "set linesize 160"
  echo "set head off"
  echo "set feedback off"
  echo "select 'grant ' || privilege || ' on directory ' || p.owner || '.' || p.table_name || ' to ' || p.grantee || DECODE (GRANTABLE, 'YES', ' with grant option ', '') || ';' from dba_directories d, sys.dba_tab_privs p where p.grantee in ('TOOLS','TAB_APEX','TAB_INT','TAB_DWH')   and D.DIRECTORY_NAME = p.TABLE_NAME   and P.OWNER = 'SYS' ;"
  ) | sqlplus -s "/ as sysdba" | findstr . > e:\dmp\DB1_SCHEMAS_%%d_directories_grant.sql
  @exit
)
Initial problem (ORA-27038) is solved in accented lines, where script is automatically deleting previous parent dump file. In script, log file is deleted as well, even thought, log files would be overwritten without any problems ... but I show that example to make code more clear.

This script automatically gather Windows directory value for expdp DIRECTORY which is used in export. This value is used to initially delete old value and to save other "non expdp" data in the same directory.

A you can see, for sending data to sqlplus I use two different methods. One that I've explained in one of mine previous posts How to redirect sqlplus result in Windows batch script (explained in first sql which gather DOS path for Oracle DIRECTORY value) and other when I create sql scripts for PUBLIC SYNONYMS and additional schema DIRECTORY values. This second method is something that I recently found out and looks more practical and convenient for use then first method.

1 month retention policy

If you want to use 1 month policy (instead of 7 days) use VB script which I called "dayofmonth.vbs" instead o previous one. Here is it's content:
WScript.Echo DatePart("m", Date)

11g news

Because overwrite problem with expdp was more then obvious, in Oracle 11g, news is that in expdp you can define additional parameter REUSE_DUMPFILES which handle overwrite issues. When set to "Y", any existing dumpfiles will be overwritten automatically. When the default values of "N" is used, an error is issued if the dump file already exists.

Cheers!

Monday, March 21, 2011

How to restore unknown database

One of the most unpleasant DBA tasks is to be first aid in total database disaster situation or in situation when you need to reinstall system that someone abandoned or suddenly left. In any case, client has very limited number of useful information and the whole work is to research from the bottom to top to bring system up and runing.

In this topic I'll try to explain how to restore Oracle database which has been installed on server which is destroyed (or resume someone failed installation). The only thing that must exist ... any kind of backup. In this case I'll speak about RMAN backup, because even the most inexperienced user know that some kind of backup is needed and RMAN is unbeatable combination.

Here are classical problems that DBA will face in a worst case scenario:
  • Database version
  • Unknown database structure
  • Database core structure
  • content of init.ora file
  • Identify backup location
  • Identify control file in backup
  • Identify necessary directory structure
In mine case I knew three things:
  1. Oracle version was 9.2.0.6
  2. Database name was DB1 (name intentionally changed to protect client data)
  3. Backup was done with RMAN to "e:\BACKUP\ORACLE\" directory
This seems to be enough to start restore procedure.
However if you are unlucky, grepping binary backup files could say to you many things. One of them is especially interesting-RMAN backup of controlfile, which is comprehensive source of information. This file is 10-100 MB in size, If database was using pfile, then those data may be found as well (picture is taken as example of other database):
On the other hand, in RMAN controfile backup, many database directory structure can be read as well (picture is taken as example of other database):
Because I'l restore database in different box, different directory, these data may be more like "nice to know" information because many of them we'll find out after successful controlfile restore.

However, every disaster/restore scenario might be specified in next easy to understand steps:
  1. Install software
  2. Create necessary directory structure
  3. Create (restore) spfile
  4. Restore controlfile
  5. Restore database
  6. Recover "up to" the archivelog (until time you want to)
  7. Open database with reset logs option
  8. BACKUP NEW DATABASE

Initial settings

Initial settings are divided in several easy steps which must succeed without any error or mistake.

Install software

I was not forced to install Windows (2003 R2 was certified platform) so I have to install only correct Oracle 9.2.0.1 and then patch to 9.2.0.6 version. If you do not know the correct patch version RMAN restore will help you with messages, and even more alert.log file could show you some interesting details.

Set important environment

Next step is to set up correct environment. In mine case I was using box with some previously installed Oracle software (Oracle 10.2) so it was crucial to set up correct data:
G:\>SET ORACLE_SID=DB1
G:\>SET ORACLE_HOME=c:\oracle\Ora92
G:\>set Path=C:\oracle\ora92\bin;C:\oracle\ora92\jre\1.4.2\bin\client;C:\oracle\ora92\jre\1.4.2\bin;C:\WINDOWS\system32;C:\WINDOWS;C:\WINDOWS\System32\Wbem
Ensure that all this is placed in one batch file to be sure that no other paths/environment are affecting your current Oracle work. Once again this is crucial to ensure full control over the process especially when you are doing this on the box where other Oracle software previously exists!

Create necessary directory structure

However, it is more then welcome to create all directories. For that we'll need:
  • bdump,cdump,udump directories (where database log and trace files are written). In mine case they will be under "G:\admin\DB1" directory with same name sub directories
  • oradata directory ("g:\oradata\DB1") where datafiles will be restored. As you see in mine case all datafiles are restored in one dir what gives you more control over restore scripts (especially if you do not know database structure)
  • archivelog directory ("G:\oradata\DB1\archive") where archivelog files will be unpacked from backup
  • Later you'll see that another directory should be made for redolog images, so I'll created now "G:\oradata\DB1\log"
So when we'll force directory structure for mentioned directories, let us put them in init.ora file as well.

Create initDB1.ora file with only two entries

db_name=DB1
job_queue_processes=0
First one is only required parameter and second one is mine insurance that after successful restore/recover started instance could not start some job which may harm any date (db_link!).

Create Instance service

Oracle instance on Windows is rather different then the same process on Linux (where you can skip this step).
G:\>oradim -new -sid %ORACLE_SID% -intpwd newpwd -startmode M
Instance created.
 
G:\>
I prefer to check in services.msc console to see that service has really started. In a case of any problems add current Windows user to ora_dba group.

Create password file

Position in directory %ORACLE_HOME%\database, and start orapwd utility to create PWDDB1.ora password file:
g:\> orapwd file=PWDDB1.ora password= entries=10 force=y

Start instance in nomount mode

After starting service, we have to start instance in nomount mode (RMAN or sqlplus).
G:>sqlplus "/ as sysdba"

SQL*Plus: Release 9.2.0.6.0 - Production on Sri Ruj 15 19:11:45 2010

Copyright (c) 1982, 2002, Oracle Corporation.  All rights reserved.

Connected to an idle instance.

SQL> startup nomount pfile='g:\initDB1.ora';
ORACLE instance started.

Total System Global Area   97591104 bytes
Fixed Size                   454464 bytes
Variable Size              46137344 bytes
Database Buffers           50331648 bytes
Redo Buffers                 667648 bytes
SQL>
During nomount mode Oracle first opens and reads the initialization parameter file (init.ora) to see how the database is configured. No datafile and other structure are checked in that moment. As you can see instance is started without problems and all necessary parameters are set automatically according Oracle version you are deploying.
SQL> show sga

Total System Global Area   97591104 bytes
Fixed Size                   454464 bytes
Variable Size              46137344 bytes
Database Buffers           50331648 bytes
Redo Buffers                 667648 bytes
SQL>
Beside that, this Oracle instance can be started and operate as well, I'll rather define all helpful parameters that will make more easy RMAN restore procedure. So here is the whole initDB1.ora file after manual editing and inserting other values:
*.background_dump_dest='G:\admin\DB1\bdump'
*.compatible='9.2.0.0.1'
*.control_file_record_keep_time=31
*.control_files='G:\oradata\DB1\control01.ctl','G:\oradata\DB1\control02.ctl'
*.core_dump_dest='G:\admin\DB1\cdump'
*.db_block_size=4096
*.db_cache_size=209715200
*.db_domain=''
*.db_file_multiblock_read_count=16
*.db_name='DB1'
*.dispatchers='(PROTOCOL=TCP) (SERVICE=DB1XDB)'
*.dml_locks=200
*.fast_start_mttr_target=300
*.hash_join_enabled=TRUE
*.instance_name='DB1'
*.java_pool_size=0
*.large_pool_size=0
*.log_archive_dest='G:\oradata\DB1\archive'
*.log_archive_format='arch%S.arc'
*.log_archive_start=TRUE
*.log_buffer=524288
*.open_cursors=1500
*.optimizer_mode='CHOOSE'
*.pga_aggregate_target=209715200
*.processes=100
*.query_rewrite_enabled='FALSE'
*.remote_login_passwordfile='EXCLUSIVE'
*.shared_pool_size=262144000
*.sort_area_size=524288
*.star_transformation_enabled='FALSE'
*.timed_statistics=TRUE
*.undo_management='AUTO'
*.undo_retention=10800
*.undo_tablespace='UNDOTBS1'
*.user_dump_dest='G:\admin\DB1\udump'
*.utl_file_dir='*' 
Restart instance to activate new parameters:
startup force nomount pfile='g:\initDB1.ora';

Restore controlfile

After database is started in nomount mode with expanded set of parameters, restoring controlfile is next vital step. In mine case client was having correct (original) directory location for RMAN backup. RMAN backup structure is fixable on any Linux environment and a little bit harder to maintain on Windows environments, especially in a cases that backup directory doesn't exist (there is no E disk for instance!). Hopefully this was not mine case.

More about RMAN directory problem may be read in one of mine previous topics Curious RMAN-05001 in database duplicate. After I copied files from tape (with NT backup/restore program) I was ready to start restore process.

Here is dir command output from RMAN backup directory:
e:\BACKUP\ORACLE>dir
 Volume in drive E is New Volume
 Volume Serial Number is C036-BB17

 Directory of e:\BACKUP\ORACLE

10.08.2009  17:20    <DIR>          .
10.08.2009  17:20    <DIR>          ..
14.09.2010  16:04        12.238.848 CF_C-4204131874-20100914-00
14.03.2011  10:11    <DIR>          CTL
14.09.2010  15:55       345.367.552 DB1_6545_1.BAK
14.09.2010  16:04     7.060.422.656 DB1_6546_1.BAK
14.09.2010  16:04           257.536 DB1_6547_1.BAK
14.03.2011  10:11    <DIR>          LOG
14.09.2010  16:04        12.226.560 SNAPCF_DB1

e:\BACKUP\ORACLE>
It is more then obvious that control file is located in CF_C-4204131874-20100914-00 file (default format is CF_%F). File name say to us it is created 14th September 2010, what also might help in some situations.

All RMAN actions will be started with this command so I'll reference them just once:
g:\>rman target / nocatalog

Recovery Manager: Release 9.2.0.6.0 - Production

Copyright (c) 1995, 2002, Oracle Corporation.  All rights reserved.

connected to target database: DB1 (not mounted)
using target database controlfile instead of recovery catalog

RMAN>
After logged in to RMAN perform next statement:
run {
set controlfile autobackup format for device type disk to 'e:\BACKUP\ORACLE\CF_%F';
allocate channel c1 type disk;
restore controlfile from 'e:\BACKUP\ORACLE\CF_C-4204131874-20100914-00';
}
Succesfull output can be seen here bellow:
RMAN> run {
2> set controlfile autobackup format for device type disk to 'e:\BACKUP\ORACLE\CF_%F';
3> allocate channel c1 type disk;
4> restore controlfile from 'e:\BACKUP\ORACLE\CF_C-4204131874-20100914-00';
5> }

executing command: SET CONTROLFILE AUTOBACKUP FORMAT

released channel: ORA_DISK_1
allocated channel: c1
channel c1: sid=12 devtype=DISK

Starting restore at 18.03.11

channel c1: restoring controlfile
channel c1: restore complete
replicating controlfile
input filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\CONTROL01.CTL
output filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\CONTROL02.CTL
Finished restore at 18.03.11
released channel: c1

RMAN>
Let us check directory where control files are restored:
G:\oradata\DB1>dir
 Volume in drive G is DB1_RESTORE
 Volume Serial Number is C88A-D7F0

 Directory of G:\oradata\DB1

18.03.2011  22:25    <DIR>          .
18.03.2011  22:25    <DIR>          ..
15.09.2010  17:36    <DIR>          archive
18.03.2011  22:26        12.226.560 CONTROL01.CTL
18.03.2011  22:26        12.226.560 CONTROL02.CTL
15.09.2010  17:37    <DIR>          log
               2 File(s)     24.453.120 bytes
               4 Dir(s)  99.140.263.936 bytes free

G:\oradata\DB1>
So far so good.
Now is time to place database in mount mode (RMAN or sqlplus):
RMAN> alter database mount;

database mounted

RMAN>

Restoring redolog files

Placing database in mount state allow us to query database against Oracle v$ and x$ (fixed) views as well as to manipulate with all datafiles.

This allow us to see information about redolog files. This is done with well known statement (from sqlplus):
SQL> col member format a50
SQL> select * from v$logfile;

    GROUP# STATUS  TYPE    MEMBER
---------- ------- ------- --------------------------------------------------
         1         ONLINE  D:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_1.LOG
         1         ONLINE  E:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_1.LOG
         2         ONLINE  D:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_2.LOG
         2         ONLINE  E:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_2.LOG
         3         ONLINE  D:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_3.LOG
         3         ONLINE  E:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_3.LOG
         4         ONLINE  D:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_4.LOG
         4         ONLINE  E:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_4.LOG

8 rows selected.
Our original DB1 database had 4 groups with two members in each group. Because each group members has same name, they should be stored in different directories. Because we will restore all files under "G:\ORADATA\DB1" directory, we have to rename redolog files. For that, starting point is to use next script:
SELECT 'SQL "ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE '||
       ''''|| '''' || member || '''' || ''''||
       ' TO ' ||
       ''''|| '''' ||'G:\ORADATA\DB1\'||
       SUBSTR(member, INSTR(member,'\', -1, 1)+1)||''''||
       ''' " ;' RMAN_COMMAND
FROM v$logfile
ORDER BY member;
Script result should be slightly changed in part for "\LOG\" subdirectory. In a case there was no more then one member per group, result is ready to use. In this case, edited and final result should look like :
run {
  SQL "ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE ''D:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_1.LOG'' TO ''G:\ORADATA\DB1\REDO1_1.LOG'' ";
  SQL "ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE ''E:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_1.LOG'' TO ''G:\ORADATA\DB1\LOG\REDO1_1.LOG'' ";
  SQL "ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE ''D:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_2.LOG'' TO ''G:\ORADATA\DB1\REDO1_2.LOG'' ";
  SQL "ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE ''E:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_2.LOG'' TO ''G:\ORADATA\DB1\LOG\REDO1_2.LOG'' ";
  SQL "ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE ''D:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_3.LOG'' TO ''G:\ORADATA\DB1\REDO1_3.LOG'' ";
  SQL "ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE ''E:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_3.LOG'' TO ''G:\ORADATA\DB1\LOG\REDO1_3.LOG'' ";
  SQL "ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE ''D:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_4.LOG'' TO ''G:\ORADATA\DB1\REDO1_4.LOG'' ";
  SQL "ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE ''E:\DB1\ORACLE\LOG\REDO1_4.LOG'' TO ''G:\ORADATA\DB1\LOG\REDO1_4.LOG'' ";
}
After successful execution (there would be no errors at all), when we query (from sqlplus) again v$logfile view, we have next result:
SQL> col member format a50
SQL> select * from v$logfile;

    GROUP# STATUS  TYPE    MEMBER
---------- ------- ------- --------------------------------------------------
         1         ONLINE  G:\ORADATA\DB1\REDO1_1.LOG
         1         ONLINE  G:\ORADATA\DB1\LOG\REDO1_1.LOG
         2         ONLINE  G:\ORADATA\DB1\REDO1_2.LOG
         2         ONLINE  G:\ORADATA\DB1\LOG\REDO1_2.LOG
         3         ONLINE  G:\ORADATA\DB1\REDO1_3.LOG
         3         ONLINE  G:\ORADATA\DB1\LOG\REDO1_3.LOG
         4         ONLINE  G:\ORADATA\DB1\REDO1_4.LOG
         4         ONLINE  G:\ORADATA\DB1\LOG\REDO1_4.LOG

8 rows selected.

SQL>
As you see all redolog files are now pointing on "G:\ORADATA\DB1" and "G:\ORADATA\DB1\LOG" locations.
If you look on file system you'll not find those files! For now, they only exist in controlfile data and they will be physically created after succesful recover.

Finding correct SCN

In mine previous post How to find correct SCN? I have desribed how to find minimal SCN which is needed to succesfuly recover database. Here is the output of that script in case of DB1 database:
SQL> /

Instance #   File # File name                      Checkpoint # Checkpoint time      Last change #    STATUS
---------- -------- ------------------------------ ------------ -------------------- ---------------- -------
1        1 D:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_SYS.DBF           746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   SYSTEM
1        2 D:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\UNDOTBS01.DBF         746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1        3 D:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_IDX1.DBF          746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1        4 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_TBL1.DBF          746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1        5 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_TBL2.DBF          746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1        6 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_ARCH.DBF          746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1        7 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\ARCHIVE.DBF           746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1        8 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_APP.DBF           746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1        9 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_CLAIM.DBF         746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       10 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_POS.DBF           746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       11 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_SUB1.DBF          746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       12 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_SUB2.DBF          746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       13 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_IMG1.DBF          746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       14 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_IMG2.DBF          746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       15 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_MOC.DBF           746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       16 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_PTM.DBF           746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       17 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_REC.DBF           746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       18 E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_ZMM.DBF           746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       19 D:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_IMG_IDX.DBF       746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       20 D:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_POS_IDX.DBF       746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE
1       21 D:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_SUB_IDX.DBF       746601062    09/14/2010 16:55:32                   ONLINE

21 rows selected.

SQL>
Last SCN is 746601062 so our SCN should be one bigger, what is 746601063.

Restore/recover database

Restore and recover should go in this moment pretty smooth because all important thisngs are passed. All now is relaying on correct backup (that all necessary files are available). Action is divided in following 5 steps:
  1. set until
  2. set newname (alow us to restore datafile to new location)
  3. restore
  4. switch datafile (write information to controlfile
  5. recover
Firstly we have to generate "SET NEW NAME" script for RMAN (to avoid hand made script). For that I use next SQL script:
set pagesize 2000
set linesize 160
set head off
set verify off
SELECT 'SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE '||
       fe.fenum ||
       ' TO '||
       ''''||'G:\ORADATA\DB1\'||
       SUBSTR(fn.fnnam, INSTR(fn.fnnam,'\', -1, 1)+1)||
       '''' RMAN_COMMAND
FROM x$kccfe fe,
     x$kccfn fn
WHERE    (   (fe.fepax != 65535 AND fe.fepax != 0 )
          OR (fe.fepax = 65535 OR fe.fepax = 0)
         )
     AND fn.fnfno = fe.fenum
     AND fe.fefnh = fn.fnnum
     AND fe.fedup != 0
     AND fn.fntyp = 4
     AND fn.fnnam IS NOT NULL
     AND BITAND (fn.fnflg, 4) != 4
ORDER BY fe.fenum
; 
Output is like:
SQL> SELECT 'SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE '||
  2        fe.fenum ||
  3        ' TO '||
  4        ''''||'G:\ORADATA\DB1\'||
  5        SUBSTR(fn.fnnam, INSTR(fn.fnnam,'\', -1, 1)+1)||
  6        ''';' RMAN_COMMAND
  7  FROM x$kccfe fe,
  8       x$kccfn fn
  9  WHERE    (   (fe.fepax != 65535 AND fe.fepax != 0 )
 10            OR (fe.fepax = 65535 OR fe.fepax = 0)
 11           )
 12       AND fn.fnfno = fe.fenum
 13       AND fe.fefnh = fn.fnnum
 14       AND fe.fedup != 0
 15       AND fn.fntyp = 4
 16       AND fn.fnnam IS NOT NULL
 17       AND BITAND (fn.fnflg, 4) != 4
 18  ORDER BY fe.fenum
 19  ;

SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 1 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\SYSTEM01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 2 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\UNDOTBS01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 3 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DRSYS01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 4 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\INDX01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 5 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\TOOLS01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 6 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\USERS01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 7 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\XDB01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 8 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IDX1.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 9 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_TBL1.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 10 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_TBL2.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 11 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_ARCH.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 12 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\ARCHIVE.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 13 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_APP.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 14 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_CLAIM.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 15 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_POS.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 16 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_SUB1.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 17 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_SUB2.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 18 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IMG1.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 19 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IMG2.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 20 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_MOC.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 21 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_PTM.DBF';

21 rows selected.

SQL>
Here is the whole RMAN command:
run {
set until SCN 746601063;
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 1 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\SYSTEM01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 2 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\UNDOTBS01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 3 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DRSYS01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 4 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\INDX01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 5 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\TOOLS01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 6 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\USERS01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 7 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\XDB01.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 8 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IDX1.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 9 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_TBL1.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 10 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_TBL2.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 11 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_ARCH.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 12 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\ARCHIVE.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 13 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_APP.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 14 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_CLAIM.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 15 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_POS.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 16 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_SUB1.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 17 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_SUB2.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 18 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IMG1.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 19 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IMG2.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 20 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_MOC.DBF';
SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 21 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_PTM.DBF';
restore database;
switch datafile all;
recover database;
}
After some time, RMAN finish with no errors. Output in mine case is bellow.
RMAN> run {
2> set until SCN 746601063;
3> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 1 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\SYSTEM01.DBF';
4> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 2 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\UNDOTBS01.DBF';
5> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 3 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DRSYS01.DBF';
6> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 4 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\INDX01.DBF';
7> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 5 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\TOOLS01.DBF';
8> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 6 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\USERS01.DBF';
9> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 7 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\XDB01.DBF';
10> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 8 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IDX1.DBF';
11> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 9 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_TBL1.DBF';
12> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 10 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_TBL2.DBF';
13> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 11 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_ARCH.DBF';
14> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 12 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\ARCHIVE.DBF';
15> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 13 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_APP.DBF';
16> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 14 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_CLAIM.DBF';
17> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 15 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_POS.DBF';
18> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 16 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_SUB1.DBF';
19> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 17 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_SUB2.DBF';
20> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 18 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IMG1.DBF';
21> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 19 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IMG2.DBF';
22> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 20 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_MOC.DBF';
23> SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 21 TO 'G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_PTM.DBF';
24> restore database;
25> switch datafile all;
26> recover database;
27> }

executing command: SET until clause

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

executing command: SET NEWNAME

Starting restore at 18.03.11

allocated channel: ORA_DISK_1
channel ORA_DISK_1: sid=12 devtype=DISK
channel ORA_DISK_1: starting datafile backupset restore
channel ORA_DISK_1: specifying datafile(s) to restore from backup set
restoring datafile 00001 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\SYSTEM01.DBF
restoring datafile 00002 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\UNDOTBS01.DBF
restoring datafile 00003 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DRSYS01.DBF
restoring datafile 00004 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\INDX01.DBF
restoring datafile 00005 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\TOOLS01.DBF
restoring datafile 00006 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\USERS01.DBF
restoring datafile 00007 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\XDB01.DBF
restoring datafile 00008 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IDX1.DBF
restoring datafile 00009 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_TBL1.DBF
restoring datafile 00010 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_TBL2.DBF
restoring datafile 00011 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_ARCH.DBF
restoring datafile 00012 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\ARCHIVE.DBF
restoring datafile 00013 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_APP.DBF
restoring datafile 00014 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_CLAIM.DBF
restoring datafile 00015 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_POS.DBF
restoring datafile 00016 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_SUB1.DBF
restoring datafile 00017 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_SUB2.DBF
restoring datafile 00018 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IMG1.DBF
restoring datafile 00019 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IMG2.DBF
restoring datafile 00020 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_MOC.DBF
restoring datafile 00021 to G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_PTM.DBF
channel ORA_DISK_1: restored backup piece 1
piece handle=E:\BACKUP\ORACLE\DB1_6546_1.BAK tag=TAG20100914T165531 params=NULL
channel ORA_DISK_1: restore complete
Finished restore at 19.03.11

datafile 1 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=22 stamp=746150571 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\SYSTEM01.DBF
datafile 2 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=23 stamp=746150571 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\UNDOTBS01.DBF
datafile 3 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=24 stamp=746150571 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DRSYS01.DBF
datafile 4 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=25 stamp=746150572 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\INDX01.DBF
datafile 5 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=26 stamp=746150572 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\TOOLS01.DBF
datafile 6 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=27 stamp=746150573 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\USERS01.DBF
datafile 7 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=28 stamp=746150573 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\XDB01.DBF
datafile 8 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=29 stamp=746150573 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IDX1.DBF
datafile 9 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=30 stamp=746150574 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_TBL1.DBF
datafile 10 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=31 stamp=746150574 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_TBL2.DBF
datafile 11 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=32 stamp=746150574 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_ARCH.DBF
datafile 12 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=33 stamp=746150575 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\ARCHIVE.DBF
datafile 13 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=34 stamp=746150575 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_APP.DBF
datafile 14 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=35 stamp=746150575 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_CLAIM.DBF
datafile 15 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=36 stamp=746150576 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_POS.DBF
datafile 16 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=37 stamp=746150576 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_SUB1.DBF
datafile 17 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=38 stamp=746150576 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_SUB2.DBF
datafile 18 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=39 stamp=746150577 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IMG1.DBF
datafile 19 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=40 stamp=746150577 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_IMG2.DBF
datafile 20 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=41 stamp=746150577 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_MOC.DBF
datafile 21 switched to datafile copy
input datafilecopy recid=42 stamp=746150578 filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\DB1_PTM.DBF

Starting recover at 19.03.11
using channel ORA_DISK_1

starting media recovery

channel ORA_DISK_1: starting archive log restore to default destination
channel ORA_DISK_1: restoring archive log
archive log thread=1 sequence=11686
channel ORA_DISK_1: restored backup piece 1
piece handle=E:\BACKUP\ORACLE\DB1_6547_1.BAK tag=TAG20100914T170448 params=NULL
channel ORA_DISK_1: restore complete
archive log filename=G:\ORADATA\DB1\ARCHIVE\ARCH11686.ARC thread=1 sequence=11686
media recovery complete
Finished recover at 19.03.11

RMAN>

Errors in alert.log

While RMAN restore is running, if you look in database alert log file, you might get frighten finding errors like:
Fri Mar 18 23:13:12 2011
Errors in file g:\admin\DB1\bdump\db1_dbw0_4020.trc:
ORA-01157: cannot identify/lock data file 10 - see DBWR trace file
ORA-01110: data file 10: 'E:\DB1\ORACLE\DBF\DB1_POS.DBF'
ORA-27041: unable to open file
OSD-04002: unable to open file
O/S-Error: (OS 3) The system cannot find the path specified.
This is normal and should be treated more like warning but error. The reason is that controlfile has still information for old directory location, which will be updated after execution of switch datafile all; command in RMAN script.

Opening database

Only thing that is left is to do is to open database with resetlogs option (RMAN or sqlplus).
RMAN> alter database open resetlogs;

database opened

RMAN>
Now redolog files should be shown as well!
:-)

The End

Situation like explained is something that should not ever happened but from time to time, me or mine colleagues hear or face situation like explained. So I tried to show mine approach in such a situations. Hope that this will help someone.

Before last regard, didn't you forget something? No?

Immediately backup the new database and make some db diary to save all important data about it!
:-)

Cheers!

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Interesting two hidden parameters (Oracle 11.2)

Oracle hidden parameters are something that any serious DBA should not use if not suggested from Oracle technical stuff. But here are two of them which might be implemented without that if you are hit with described problems, like I had.

_DATAFILE_WRITE_ERRORS_CRASH_INSTANCE

In patch set 11.2.0.2 a new behavior for datafile write errors has been implemented. With this release ANY write error to a datafile will cause the instance to abort. Before 11.2.0.2 those errors usually led to an offline datafile if the database operates in archivelog mode (your production database do, don't they?!) and the datafile does not belong to the SYSTEM tablespace. Internal discussion found this behavior not up-to-date and aligned with RAC systems and modern storages. Therefore it has been changed and a new underscore parameter got introduced.
_DATAFILE_WRITE_ERRORS_CRASH_INSTANCE=TRUE
This is the default setting´and the new behavior beginning with Oracle 11.2.0.2

If you would like to revert to the pre-11.2.0.2 behavior you'll have to set in your init.ora/spfile this parameter to false. But keep in mind that there's a reason why this has been changed.

You'll find more info in MOS Note: 7691270.8.

_MEMORY_IMM_MODE_WITHOUT_AUTOSGA

According Kurt Van Meerbeeck pretty well known member in the Oracle community, who is owner of jDUL/DUDE, a database unloading tool which bypasses the Oracle database engine and access data directly on the block level, since Oracle 11.2.0.1 even though you haven't set neither SGA_TARGET nor MEMORY_TARGET (or set it to 0) the database might still do memory resize operations.

Reason why this behavior has been changed: Prevention of ORA-4031 errors.

ORA-04031: unable to allocate string bytes of shared memory

Cause: More shared memory is needed than was allocated in the shared pool.

Action: If the shared pool is out of memory, either use the DBMS_SHARED_POOL package to pin large packages, reduce your use of shared memory, or increase the amount of available shared memory by increasing the value of the initialization parameters SHARED_POOL_RESERVED_SIZE and SHARED_POOL_SIZE. If the large pool is out of memory, increase the initialization parameter LARGE_POOL_SIZE.

But on databases with extremely high loads this can cause real troubles. Further information can be found in MOS Note:1269139.1. And the parameter set to TRUE by default is called:
_MEMORY_IMM_MODE_WITHOUT_AUTOSGA=TRUE

Upgrade to Oracle 11g document

Nice document for upgrading to Oracle 11g can be found here.

In that document, on slides 254 and 239, previously referenced cases are exposed as well.

Hope this will also help someone.

Cheers!

Saturday, March 12, 2011

Bye bye IE6

These days, appeared a new website on the beautiful domain http://ie6countdown.com. If you guessed that it was a countdown to shutdown Internet Explorer 6, you are not too far away from the truth. Specifically, the web is engaged in a kind of countdown to extinction of the browser and hated it at "less than 1%" market share. The funniest thing is that this is genuine Microsoft site.

On the web, on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of Internet Explorer 6, Microsoft recommends (and pray) that visitors will finally get rid of the plague of the Internet and nightmares every web programmers and designers. In addition to asking that all pages of denying support Internet Explorer 6, Microsoft's own browser wants to put an end to the education of visitors and their friends about what IE6 is garbage, giving the whole list of reasons.

So, for all new XP installations, which still exists a lot, I suggest firstly to go to http://ninite.com where your can download all important software in first (harmless) touch with Internet.

So this small topic is contributed to MS which has once fair and right words about their software. Finally we have survived that!

Cheers!

Zagreb u srcu!

Copyright © 2009-2014 Damir Vadas

All rights reserved.


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